the nursery – wooden shingles on the wall

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You know we had some special plans for decorating our nursery wall with wooden shingles which we imported from our latest trips to the far west of Austria. I love the look of those little beaver tail shingled houses in the region of Vorarlberg and I thought it would look beautiful in our nursery too. Like small ruffles – girly but not too sugary.
We had our insider Anja over (she’s originally from Vorarlberg knowing those ruched houses too well) to help us dealing with the shingles. My dad and Martin decided to go with an air pressure stapler instead of glue and so we started.

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My part was (being 38 weeks pregnant and almost unable to move in any other way than far-preggo-slow-mo) to sort the shingles (there’s a front and a backside and I also sorted out all of the broken or twisted ones). While my dad, Martin and Anja began to ajust the laser and start to staple the first shingles onto the wall.
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After a few rows we they had figured out the best way to get a good and even result and a pretty productive workflow. Like with every work the beginning is the hardest until you find the right flow, here it was tricky to decide whether to mount the shingles with the mathematical levelness or the optical one, the house is old and hardly anything in there is really even. (we went for the middle path and did a mixture between mathematical and optical)
That day we worked for a few more hours until we reached the light switch.
Martin spend his entire after-(day-job)-work-hours during the entire week in the treehouse mounting hundreds of shingles one after the other and dealing with tricky parts like embed the light switch fixture. A hell of a lot of work but it truly payed off.
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I love the outcome so much! Maybe the nursery is my favorite room so far! (sorry bathroom!)
Schorsch and Martin also installed sliding doors for Linda’s future built-in-cupboard.
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I painted the doors in three different colors and of course I chose them from my favorite color supplier: Farrow & Ball
(Hello, my name is Katharina and I’m a F&B addict!..) I picked a vivid orange, a brownish shade of grey and a (not too pink) salmon tone. Again I wanted it to look warm and girly but not too-hello-kitty-girly-pink (no offence miss kitty!).
Farrow and Ball paints are pricey but they have such a high coverage that I could paint the cupboard door (three times) and it was still enough paint left from the 0,75l container to paint Linda’s changing unit and the door frame also with “London clay”.
I show you the results in a few weeks when everything is finished and we are finally moving in!

 

xmas getaway

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Hello, and welcome to atreefor2 in 2015!
Hope you had a lovely holiday season. We had a great time and got a lot of important things done (keep you on track with those things in upcoming posts but for now I want to share our last roadtrip for the year 2014.
A few days before xmas we headed far west to our friends the Kaufmann family in beautiful Bezau to pick up some more wooden shingles which we’ll need for our nursery-shingle-wall project (soon to come!)
We packed our bags (and Gustav) and had a lovely and relaxing weekend in Vorarlberg.
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This time we even found the time to visit the Werkraum Bregenzerwald – a small showroom/museum/cafe where you can stroll around and get inspired by amazing design and craftsmanship from the region.
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Martin fell in love with a huuuuuge lounge sofa and I was amazed by this beautiful fireplace – what a great statement piece.
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We got this amazing felt swing from Anjas mum and I can’t wait to try it with our own baby!
In the meantime, Anja had fun on her own trying the baby-sledge.
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There was even time to get a much needed haircut! And although I’m always feeling kind of uncomfortable at hairdressers (they are my type of dentist) I was so happy with the outcome, I think he did a great job!
Later that afternoon we picked up the shingles at a small workshop where they handcraft each and every single shingle…
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All of the wooden shingles are split out of wooden trunks (they don’t cut the wood because if you split it it lasts much longer and is resistant against the harsh austrian weather conditions. A wooden exterior with splitted shingles lasts about 60 to 100 years!)
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With the punch press they get the typical beaver tail shape out of each of the rectangular splitted shingles.
We bougth 3 more bags full of shingles and I can’t wait to put them on our nursery wall… I guess it will be a lot of work but I hope it will turn out nice…