built-in cupboard

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We try to use every tiny nook for storage in our treehouse. It’s a rather small house (at least for Austrian standards) and although we want try need to downsize and get rid of S T U F F we do need proper and smart storage solutions for the stuff we cant get rid off.
footnote: I really looking forward to life with less things… I apprecheate the movement of downsizing and living simple life. Where you are surounded with quality stuff or things you really love. Reward yourself with quality items rather than quantity… Do you know Melanie of a small life. she’s my downsizing hero… and I really love her shiny airstream.
Anyway we decided to use the space within the attic by building a cupboard on one side. We used the same system like we did in Lindas nursery. With sliding doors. As doors we reused old wooden window shutters from my parents house which where used 80 to 100 years ago within the old windows.
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Schorsch and Martin renovated and adapted them. As they have been folding shutters they braced them with wooden strips and sanded them while my mum painted them with a matte finish from farrow and ball (wevet in estate eggshell).

 

the nursery – wooden shingles on the wall

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You know we had some special plans for decorating our nursery wall with wooden shingles which we imported from our latest trips to the far west of Austria. I love the look of those little beaver tail shingled houses in the region of Vorarlberg and I thought it would look beautiful in our nursery too. Like small ruffles – girly but not too sugary.
We had our insider Anja over (she’s originally from Vorarlberg knowing those ruched houses too well) to help us dealing with the shingles. My dad and Martin decided to go with an air pressure stapler instead of glue and so we started.

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My part was (being 38 weeks pregnant and almost unable to move in any other way than far-preggo-slow-mo) to sort the shingles (there’s a front and a backside and I also sorted out all of the broken or twisted ones). While my dad, Martin and Anja began to ajust the laser and start to staple the first shingles onto the wall.
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After a few rows we they had figured out the best way to get a good and even result and a pretty productive workflow. Like with every work the beginning is the hardest until you find the right flow, here it was tricky to decide whether to mount the shingles with the mathematical levelness or the optical one, the house is old and hardly anything in there is really even. (we went for the middle path and did a mixture between mathematical and optical)
That day we worked for a few more hours until we reached the light switch.
Martin spend his entire after-(day-job)-work-hours during the entire week in the treehouse mounting hundreds of shingles one after the other and dealing with tricky parts like embed the light switch fixture. A hell of a lot of work but it truly payed off.
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I love the outcome so much! Maybe the nursery is my favorite room so far! (sorry bathroom!)
Schorsch and Martin also installed sliding doors for Linda’s future built-in-cupboard.
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I painted the doors in three different colors and of course I chose them from my favorite color supplier: Farrow & Ball
(Hello, my name is Katharina and I’m a F&B addict!..) I picked a vivid orange, a brownish shade of grey and a (not too pink) salmon tone. Again I wanted it to look warm and girly but not too-hello-kitty-girly-pink (no offence miss kitty!).
Farrow and Ball paints are pricey but they have such a high coverage that I could paint the cupboard door (three times) and it was still enough paint left from the 0,75l container to paint Linda’s changing unit and the door frame also with “London clay”.
I show you the results in a few weeks when everything is finished and we are finally moving in!

 

storage room with salvaged wood & our former kitchen backsplash

Do you remember? Back in summer 2013 when we got rid of our floor and all the sand underneath…

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I made my weight for the old kitchen floor. We rescued it in one piece and although Martin was not a big fan of keeping the huge piece of wooden planks he agreed.
Fast forward to 2015. Early this year Martin, my cousin Robert and his girlfriend Claudia helped us to use those beautiful wooden planks to cover our storage room in the attic with all the wood.
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After my dad took the floor apart we had 11 planks. Martin brushed and sanded them and I oiled them roughly with a slightly white tinted wood oil.
I used some cloth to do that and immediately whiped off the oil as soon as I brought it onto the wood (I just wanted the wood to be slightly white washed). Please be careful and read the instructions on the tin! If your oil is not 100% natural (olive or linseed) those cloth have to be stored in a bucket of water after use because they are flammable and combustible!
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Can you spot the difference? One of the planks had been installed without the oil treatment! The white-wash gives it a lighter look and preserve it from getting dark or yellowish.
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As we did tiles as a kitchen backsplash (just because we had so many spare tiles left from the bathroom) we thought of reuse one of the beautiful old salvaged windows as a balustrade next our new staircase.
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We built a frame again with the construction timber to fit one of the windows in… after a few adaptions (which my dad used to buoy up the spirits!) it fitted perfectly.
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The next day I painted the green side of the window white also to give it a lighter touch (the green paint was in a really bad state from all the sun and harsh weather conditions over the last 40 years!)
I love it when all the pieces come together. The house is completed more and more and all the salvaged pieces finally find their way into our project!