drywall builder – part 1

atreefor2_000022
Last weekend we ended our slow & lazy start of the year sick leave with some drywall covering in our extension. Some time ago we covered the lower half of the walls (we needed to do that on time so that the floor screed could be filled in).
atreefor2_000017
It was the first sunny day within weeks and we’ve been lucky to welcome Codo, Jantschy and Toby on the site for giving us a hand with the wall finish.

atreefor2_000016
atreefor2_000019
atreefor2_000006

The boys had an elaborate system of working together.
atreefor2_000008
The first room was done really quickly and while they where still measuring, cutting and mounting panels I was upstairs in the attic and had to do some preparations for one of our next big projects: the thermal insulation of the roof.

atreefor2_000001

I needed to seal every hole and crack to make sure the house is air-tight. (Otherwise cold air will find its way through the cracks into the warm house, condensate there and mold will apear – much likely on spots you can’t see it for month… until it get’s harmful.) To prevent that and seal all of the tiny leaks I worked with polyurethane foam, which I really loved! (I know that may be political incorrect and environmental questionable but it’s really a lot of fun foaming around with this stuff.)

atreefor2_000002
atreefor2_000003
Unfortunately this foam-stuff is also sticky as hell. And I got a unintentional haircut by Jantschy (some of this stuck in my tiny-neck-hair-fluff – OUCH!)
note to myself: next time better wear a cap and get your hair cut with a sharp knife.atreefor2_000011
But look at Jantschy’s face… I think he suffered as much as I did!

atreefor2_000012
stay tuned for some more photos still to come…

 

energy efficient renovation actions – part I

insulation004
We are currently working on energy efficient winter-updates for our house. (although the weather is rather mild at the moment, but you never know! maybe winter sets in just a little late…)
insulation001

We started small at the basement:
Part one was to thermally insulate all the pipes of our underfloor heating. We covered the two main pipes running along the ceiling of the basement with (fancy looking) highly efficient heat-pipe insulation. (made of Rockwool)
Yes, I know we still have the christmas lights up and the big holes in the wall covered with beautiful photos… but it just looks better that way!
insulation002
insulation003

Gustav was our special guest on the site that day. He was all eyes  and ears what we’re doing with this silver pipes.
But he was also a little unsure what to think and barked at them everytime we put them somewhere (all pitbull owners will agree – they are a truly vicious and fight silver-insulating-pipes till death!)
insulation006
Attaching those pipes was really easy (except for the corners). Just measure, cut and stick together. As simple as that!
insulation007
insulation008
insulation009
insulation005
After we finished the insulation work we ran out of material, we went upstairs and finished a few of the wooden dry walls in our extension. I  was in charge of the insulation material and Martin mounted the planks. I worked with a mask because I can’t stand the insulation material (mineral rock wool) without any protection… brrrrrr.
(working for hours with that stuff really starts to irritate your airways – so be save!).
insulation012
insulation010
insulation011
Again we ran out of material – so we wrote a long shopping list and called it a day!

 

new years resolution: keeping it tidy

cleaning4
We started the new year and the new site season with some cleaning and reorganization at the house. Martin (aka Adrian Monk) is a true beliver of organization and tidiness. And I think its contagious. I really fell for this idea as well. A tidy and organized workspace is so much more fun to work in/with. So my new resolution for 2014 will be: try to keep everything clean and organized (at least as clean as a site can be).
cleaning3
We reorganized our wooden panels and tools to finish our walls in the extension.
cleaning2
And finally removed all the plastic cover sheets and tapes which protected the wooden window frames during construction and wall rendering for the last few month. We used a TESA masking tape, which I can highly recommend. It didnt left stains on the wooden frames and was easy to remove.
Unfortunately I found a small but deep dent in the wood! oh noooooooo!
It’s directly at (my)eye level on the most used door (I assume thats why it’s there! all of the construction pieces and tools were brought into the house through this door) But I think I’ll try to repair it with wood filler. (hope it will turn out fine and I’m not making it worse!)
cleaning5
He’s keeping the spirits up! ♥
Take a look at our “naked” attic walls; now they are already plastered, I’ll share the photos in my next post.
cleaning1
I was proud as punch and happy as a lark to release the window from it’s covering sheets!
It felt really good to start the year with a white and tidy canvas!